Imprimis: Links and Tidbits, 12 November 2010
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Quite a few links this week, on a smattering of different subjects:


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Fall MLit/MFA Thesis Festival - Session 3
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And we're back for the third and final session of this semester's MLitt/MFA presentations. Four more presenters this time around:

If the Shrew Fits: Chronology, Misogyny, and Dichotomy in the Taming Plays
presented by Andrea Kelley

Andrea's presentation opens with a video montage of various productions and adaptations of The Taming of the Shrew, illustrating Kate's dramatic arc throughout the course of the story. The selection includes the Taylor-Burton Shrew, a puppetry show, 10 Things I Hate About You, and a recent BBC update, thus representing selections from across several decades of modern media. ...Read more

Fall MLit/MFA Thesis Festival - Session 2
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So we're back, after what Dr. Menzer hopes was "a substantial lunch, for a zesty palate cleanser of scholarship."

Ford, and Jonson, and Middleton, Oh My!
presented by Carolyn R. Alvarez

Carolyn introduces her presentation by stating that she was attracted to the idea of looking at early modern authors who are not Shakespeare. She questions the societal influences that have made Shakespeare the "poet of the millennium." She then brings out "Gary Taylor" (presented by Bonnie Morrison) and actors portraying a number of early modern authors: John Ford (portrayed by Riley Steiner), Thomas Middleton (Stephanie Tschetter), Ben Jonson (Katie Crandol), and William Shakespeare (K.C. Capron) -- chosen in part due to revived interest in production or publication of their plays. (Kit Marlowe also appears, briefly, only to be told that he died too early to be considered in this thesis). Carolyn takes a few moments to provide biographies for these authors, while 'gentlemen' themselves snipe and snark at each other in the foreground (Crandol's Jonson, nipping liberally from a flask, gets in a few particularly good zings, as does Steiner's geriatric Ford). ...Read more

Fall MLit/MFA Thesis Festival - Session 1
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Welcome back to another live blogging event here at the American Shakespeare Center. We're pleased to bring you the Fall 2010 Thesis Festival, featuring presentations of the works of MLitt and MFA students in our partner program at Mary Baldwin College. We'll start off with three papers in our morning session, followed by an early afternoon session after lunch, and then a later afternoon session after a tea break. There will be a separate blog post for each session, which I'll be updating as we go.

Miranda as Native: An Exploration of Sexual Politics and Cultural Hegemony in Caribbean and African Postcolonial Adaptations of The Tempest
presented by Amy L. Bolis

Presentation begins with Maxim Overton reading a speech of Caliban's, while Kimberly Maurice and Johnny Adkins echo with descriptions of the character from elsewhere in the play. Amy explicates that the language reveals the "legacy of colonization," and that in The Tempest, we see Caliban as the colonized and Prospero as the colonizer, and then asks -- where does that put Miranda? ...Read More

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